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whos in these gold shoes
Saved 1/31/13 to PopSugar Q and A

Cheap Junior Bridesmaid Dresses


On Friday morning, we filled our first jar of links for this school year. Students receive links for demonstrating our RES Schoolwide Expectations: Respect Yourself; Respect Others; Respect Your Environment. Our first three days of school were spent reviewing these expectations and deciding together what that means for our classroom. We also really been focusing on showing expected behavior in line while we travel throughout the building. This spring, students have been working on a number of small research projects to learn all about Vermont history. We also explored history with a variety of field trips, but more on those later! As a class, we worked together to decide on 26 topics to research and present in our abc book. We learned that yeast is a living Bridesmaid Dresses South Africa culture (like in yogurt) and creates bubbles of carbon dioxide to help the bread rise. Next, the other ingredients were added to the yeast. These ingredients include flour (which is measured to be fluffy, not packed down!), oil (to keep the bread soft), salt (for flavor to keep steam in the loaf so that it rises), and sugar (which comes out to the edges of the bread and turns brown caramelization). These ingredients need to be stirred together to form the dough. You know the dough is ready when a spoon stands up straight in the dough this means that the gluten is strong enough. Once a dough is formed, it needs to be kneaded (or mixed by hand) to finish getting ready. After we finished kneading the dough, it rests for a long time (90 minutes) to rise. After the 90 minutes has passed, it time to shape the dough. Bread dough can be shaped in many different ways can be formed in a long loaf (like typical French bread), or braided in Cheap Wedding Guest Dresses a loaf, it can be twisted into pretzels or rolled into cinnamon buns. Last Thursday, we went to the Audobon in Huntington to explore how maple syrup is made! We learned about the whole process how to tap the trees, collect the sap, use the evaporator to remove excess water, boil the sap, and we even got to sample some syrup in the end! A lot of us liked the grade the best, which is the lightest syrup that we tested. We also got to see how the Native Americans used to boil sap by placing it in a hollowed out log and adding hot stones. Our class did a great job listening to the directors and helping collect sap. We could not have asked for a more beautiful day! Additional thanks to Julie, Jess, and Linda for volunteering to chaperone. On Wednesday, the Explorers welcomed sugar makers Roger and Doug Brown from Slopeside Syrup to share the history of sugaring, the process and some of the economic implications. The brothers have been sugaring a short time, but have learned a lot. Typically, sugar bushes in Vermont have 50-60 trees per acre, tapping both Cheap Junior Bridesmaid Dresses sugar maples and red maples. Forty gallons of sap are collected to make just one gallon if syrup! Slopeside boils 1,400 gallons of sap every hour, filling up a forty gallon drum. Sugar makers in Vermont are beginning to use vacuums and tubing now because it doubles the amount of sap collected from every tree. Finally, we went outside and tapped a maple tree in our school backyard. Over the next week, we be watching our tree, collecting the sap and keeping track of the temperature. Then, Doug and Roger will boil our sap into syrup for a special treat!