Wynter's nook
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Saved 5/02/07 to Wynter's nook

Teaching a child how to read


My goal with Jakob this summer is to teach him to read. He was supposed to be reading by the time he got out of kindergarten, but the only words he knows are red, blue, love, one, the, green, yellow, is, a, an, boy, mom, dad, and a few others. He knows those because I managed to teach him to spell them, and he spells them out loud and recognizes the spelling (he learns in the weirdest ways, lol). We have dozens of the 1st reader books, and I read to him several times at night...always have. He HATES words, phonics, and spelling, but he absolutely loves math (sooo opposite from me, lol). It's going to be a challenge. He does have good reading comprehension, because they bring home books every week. The parents read them the books every night, and they are tested on them every Friday. The lowest score he has gotten on those is a 90, but the majority of his grades are 100s. He also can 'read' a story back to me - not in the same words but he understands the story for every page. When we read, I do make him read with me. We'll try to sound the words out, and he says every word with me. It's just not clicking.

Is there a better way to teach them? I bought him the whole series of Dick & Jane books a couple of months ago, because they're so easy to read. That's what I learned to read with, but those aren't working too well either. :( He loves books just as long as someone is reading them to him, but he doesn't want to do it on his own. I'm not a very good mom when it comes to this, because I apparently have no clue what I'm doing. He's supposed to be reading about 50 words by sight right now, and as much as I've tried, he's not anywhere close.

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Wynter's nook

colormesticky colormesticky 7 years 19 weeks
I didn't learn to read until first grade. I can't believe it's kindergarten now. Another example, sort of like atox's. I was the second youngest person in my class, and always painfully average. Graduated high school with a 2.7. My little sister was held back in preschool so she was the second OLDEST in her class, and had straight As till she graduated. (excepting one B in math, but meh.) Holding him back definitely isn't going to do him any harm.
Shiloh-Jolie-Pitt Shiloh-Jolie-Pitt 7 years 19 weeks
teaching a child how to read must be one of the most difficult and rewarding tasks ever. I'm sure you'll find the best way Wynty. I'm going to ask my mom how she did it because she taught us all to read and by the time I got to kindergarten I could read without any problems. And haven't stopped ever since :-P _________________________________________ * I want a vacation *
atoxicsparkle atoxicsparkle 7 years 19 weeks
That is great that Jake is now opened up to the classroom, and I'm sure by the end of Kindergarten next year he will be beyond ready for 1st grade :D Just make sure that if he does start acting like he is bored with the material toward the end of next year because he is absorbing it now, have the teacher give him enrichment packets to keep him on his toes and from getting in trouble ;) AND how AWESOME is it that you have Brandon helping with the homework!! That is good that he will have a head start when he gets to kindergarten, and who knows, he may test out high and be moved up a grade! And don't worry about college, there are plenty of scholarships and grants you can get :woohoo:
wynter wynter 7 years 19 weeks
Aww, I'm glad Cody had a turn-around like that. That's what I was afraid of for Jake. I don't mine holding him back. That'll give him an extra year at home. :p Seriously, he was barely 5 when he started kindergarten, and his speech was on par with a 3 year old. His speech has gotten MUCH better this year, so I'm hoping with that, he'll pick up on more things next year. I know his teacher said he was very reserved and quiet earlier in the year, but as his speech has progressed, he has started to open up, ask questions, and play with all the kids instead of just a couple. He acted out a lot at the beginning of the school year, and now...it's been about 3 months with nothing but green faces. She said that he's absorbing the material now (they're doing math though, lol He's been adding & subtracting on his fingers since he was a young 4), but he missed out on absorbing everything at the beginning of the year. My only problem is having the boys one year apart in school. Oye. College is going to be expensive. Brandon will be nearly 6 by the time he starts kindergarten, and he absorbs new things really quick so I don't think he'll have any problems. He's doing Jake's homework with him everynight as it is. I have a feeling he's going to be really bored in kindergarten repeating the homework three years in a row. :p
atoxicsparkle atoxicsparkle 7 years 19 weeks
I'm sorry Wynt, perhaps an afternoon nap is in store for everyone? Yes, definitely read up on oral and kinesthetic learning, there are many great websites that can give you activities specified for those types of learners. And him being the youngest in his class more than likely is affecting his speed of performance. Now that's not true for all students who are younger, but generally it is. And I must say I'm glad he's repeating Kindergarten. People throw a big tantrum about holding kids back, that it damages their social skills and their self-esteem. Let me just rant for a minute that those people are freakin IDIOTS! Case in point: In the classroom I taught in, 2nd grade, there was a little boy held back, we'll call him Cody. The year before, Cody was the farthest behind in his class. By the middle of the year he HATED school with a passion and got aggressive and violent because he was so frustrated and lost. The kids in his class made fun of him for a) not knowing everything they knew, and b) being a baby because he wasn't smart. If his parents had refused to hold him back, it would have been the same way for the rest of his education. He would always be behind, he would have always been frustrated with trying to learn and more than likely dropped out of school eventually, and his peers would keep on with their same belittleing of him. Yeah, that wouldn't damage his self-esteem at all :oy: But he was held back, and he was at the fore-front of his class. He loved helping me help the other students because he was finally able to understand what it was that we were learning. There would be times he would jump up with excitement and say "I get it now! I didn't even understand this last year but now it's easy! Can I help other people Ms. Short?" OMG that would totally make my day. All the students in the class looked up to him because he knew what he was doing and could help them. He started to love learning again and would say how glad he was to be in school, when last year he would run kicking, screaming, biting out of the classroom saying he hated everyone. He has high self-esteem and a great outlook on life, which people might not think is important in an 8 year-old, but that is one of the most crucial things to give a child. I know he will go far and do great things, all because he was held back and able to learn at his pace. Ok, rant done :rotfl:
wynter wynter 7 years 19 weeks
The "I know" was in reference to what the school systems expect, lol I'm rambling and didn't finish my thought. Can you tell that I was up with Brandon all night and didn't get any sleep? lol He's not feeling too great. :( He's sleeping now, but I can't go to sleep since Jake gets out at lunch today. If I fall asleep now, I'd never wake up by 12:30, even with the alarm clock. I miss Jason's help. :(
wynter wynter 7 years 19 weeks
I know atox. I work with him, but I'm careful not to push him. I'll have to read up on that type of learning so I can learn about it. It's my goal for the summer, but he's repeating Kindergarten next year, so if he doesn't learn, it won't be the end of the world. Next year, they expect him to be able to read paragraphs and identify adjectives, verbs, nouns, etc.. and he's not even close to ready for that stage of work. He was one of the youngest in the class this year, so I think the extra year will help him.
atoxicsparkle atoxicsparkle 7 years 19 weeks
Wynter, from what you have said above, it definitley sounds like he is an oral/kinesthetic learner. If he learned the other words by spelling them out loud, perhaps practice that with every word? Like, get one of the Dick and Jane books and read it to him. Then have him pick out the words he liked to have you both say, spell, sound-out, say again. Make a game out of it too, like tell him he has to read/spell/sound-out a word from every other page, and if he can do that, he gets X/gets to go to X/etc. Keep a list of the words that he eventually learns so that you can keep going back to them for reinforcement. And whatever you do, do NOT pressure him. That is the number one killer of learning, is when they are pressured and rushed and learning becomes this horrible thing that they just want to go away. And just give him time. I hate these standards they have set up for each grade now. Just because he doesn't know 50 words by now does not mean he behind or doing bad. All kids learn at a different pace, and their education needs to be based around their ability to learn. Unfortunately our country doesn't seem to care about that, no matter how many times studies show them that standardized schooling is less beneficial.
wynter wynter 7 years 19 weeks
Just what I'm already doing, Jinx. She mentioned flash cards, but I can't get anywhere with him using those.
Jinx Jinx 7 years 19 weeks
I don't think I can be alot of help. Does the school offer any ideas? ------------------------------------------------------ "All my life, I wanted to be someone, I guess I should have been more specific." Jane Wagner
wynter wynter 7 years 19 weeks
He'll be 6 next month. Thanks Karma!
karmasabitch karmasabitch 7 years 19 weeks
How old is he? 5 or 6??
karmasabitch karmasabitch 7 years 19 weeks
Oh well boo to that then :( I guess I'll just ask my mom and get back to you :ROTFL:
wynter wynter 7 years 19 weeks
We honestly have every Leap Frog toy available! lol He plays some games too. I like the Jumpstart ones, and he does well with those. I also got him a subscription to headsprout.com, and he loves that also. He just can't remember the stuff no matter how much I try to drill it into his head. :(
karmasabitch karmasabitch 7 years 19 weeks
I would try adding Leap Frog reading products in with the book reading.. the computer learning games are GREAT for teaching this sort of thing! When we were trying to adopt Patricia (she was Polish, spoke no English) I played the computer games with her and she started to learn words really fast. I worked at Zany Brainy and EB Kids and got a lot of excellent feedback from 2nd time buyers as well :D Other than that I'll ask my mom since she is my go to person on any and all questions about kids :P
wynter wynter 7 years 19 weeks
I'm not sure it'd work for us. I'll see how this summer goes. He listens to his teachers better than me. :/
Twinkle1 Twinkle1 7 years 19 weeks
Have you considered homeschooling Wynter? I was thinking if we ever end up back in the US I might have to do that.
Twinkle1 Twinkle1 7 years 19 weeks
I remember in order to pass kindergarten I had to know my my colors, ABCs and how to tie my shoes. All this rushing and overloading little kids isn't going to benefit anyone in the long run. I totally feel for parents there though.
wynter wynter 7 years 19 weeks
I wish they were that way here, Twinkle. I think Jason needs to find an overseas job for a few years, lol
wynter wynter 7 years 19 weeks
Now? Fractions, adding, subtracting, spelling, writing sentences, reading, geesh, I don't know what all. It's been a rough year for both of us. 2 1/2 weeks left, and I can't wait for a break from homework every night! lol
JessNess JessNess 7 years 19 weeks
In the US they put so much parents to teach their kids things. Before I could go to kindergarten I had to know my ABC's and how to spell my name- aren't you suppose to learn your ABCs in kindergarten?. That about 15 years ago so I dont even want to know what kids have to know now. Also when I was in 2nd and 3rd grade you had to know your multiplication but it was not taught in school. They expected your parents to teach you. When I was in high school I was tutoring kids in elementary and they were learning the hardest things ever. I had 3rd graders learning basic geometry :jawdrop: Its all too much
Twinkle1 Twinkle1 7 years 19 weeks
I have no experience teaching a child to read. Sorry. In Finland they prefer you leave that up to the schools to do so they learn the "right way". So our daughter didn't learn to read until she was seven and in first grade. They're very concerned about not putting too much on kids too early here. You're a great mom Wynter. He'll learn when he's ready. Don't be too hard on yourself. :hug:
JessNess JessNess 7 years 19 weeks
wynter- you are a good mom. It is just sometimes difficult to teach things. When I was little my mom was teaching me the alphabet. She was trying everything bit I just could not connect sounds to the letter (one reason I think I have dyslexia) She finally taught me the alphabet in sign language and for whatever reason it clicked in my head that way. Also she worked with me all the time with flash cards when I was learning math. Seriously with out all of this I would not be where I am now- I probably would have been HORRIBLE in school. I think its great that you are trying so hard. Sadly there are a lot of parents who wouldnt. I don't have advice on how to get him to read but you may have to try different things until something clicks